Monday, November 26, 2012

The very, very best of Little Lulu

When we get the chance to look back at things we enjoyed as children, things like comic books, for example, we're often disappointed. Comics that seemed clever to our childhood eyes might seem simplistic or corny or even insipid when we're adults. Happily, that's not the case with Little Lulu.  I loved the comics then and I still do.  John Stanley, who wrote and drew Little Lulu from the late 1940s through the late 1950s, infused his stories with genuine wit.  These were probably were at their peak in the early 1950s when each was a thick fifty-two pages and boasted more elaborate covers and lengthier stories as seen below.

As per Wikipedia, John Stanley's writing style has been described as employing "colorful, S. J. Perelman-ish language and a decidedly bizarre, macabre wit (reminiscent of writer Roald Dahl), with storylines that were cohesive and tightly constructed, with nary a loose thread in the plot. He has been favorably compared to the legendary Carl Barks, and cartoonist Fred Hembeck has dubbed him "the most consistently funny cartoonist to work in the comic book medium". Captain Marvel co-creator C. C. Beck remarked "The only comic books I ever read and enjoyed were Little Lulu and Donald Duck."

In the last decade or so, Stanley has become more appreciated and much of his work has been reprinted, much of it in expensive hardbound, boxed volumes.

My personal favorite is this story of degradation, humiliation and revenge originally published in August, 1951. 


















2 comments:

walterworld said...

That was great. Hadn't read a comic in years. Thanks!

walterworld said...

That was great. Hadn't read a comic in years. Thanks!